Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the nation, aimed at civil installations and not soft or human targets but in times can, the anc their acts bore no comparison to the thousands murdered in otherwise disappeared by the regime. >> there are many people whofeed futile for us to continue talkintalking peace and nonviole against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. well i'm on the defenseless people. >> in 1962 a vishz crack downwas caught up in the regime's wide net. his anc colleagues were rounded up and jailed. in 1963 during what came to be called the ravonia trial, the government tried and convicted mandela and seven of the top command of the anc on charges of sabotage and fomenting revolution. a capital offense. the eight were sentenced to life in prison. even from his cell on robin island, the alcatraz like island, six miles from cape town, mandela was uncompromising, says helen, a parliament service person. >> mattresses, the fact that thr between, and mostly about the behavior of the war den who has a tattoo on the back of his hands of the swastika. he says this man is very bad, he treats us badly. >> but e
that as a particular front, and i think that the way mandela operated certainly was present in the anc, was to provide influence people that he was on the right coarse. and if you weren't persuaded that was fine as well. so i always think of him as someone who didn't know his opposition as a club or a shield, he used it to try to unite the country. at our first meeting after he became president and i was elected leader of party in may 1994. he asked me to have breakfast in cape town, and he said, you know, toni, the opposition must hold up a mirror to the government. and we might not always like what we see in it, but that is a democracy. and he was pretty true to that. if you [ inaudible ] on certain toes of his organization, he was none too happy, but i think in the main he lived up to the ideals that he set out for the >> nelson mandela leaves a lasting legacy across the africa continent. let's hear from malcolm who has been speaking to a uganda journalist. >> we are outside of uganda's sports stadium. it was built in 1997 and it was named after nelson mandela. mandela visited uganda on several occ
, was release all nt a.n.c. leaders, which were also an robin island, including governor mbecki. we were political opponens. we were opposing each other with regard to the potential vote when an election came up. secondly, mostly around the issue of ongoing political violent. tensions grew between us at times to high levels. at all times, notwithstanding the intentions, we found it possible to rise above them when approached by my negotiators to find solutions and prevent negotiations from stalling. nelson mandela - he was a very special man. i think nothing is being overplayed. i think he is held in high - the highest esteem. not only by the overwhelming majority of south africans, but worldwide. i think he's a towering figure of the past century. therefore, i think we should pay him the tribe ute and the honour which he'd like - lay the foundation his integrity, his emphasis on the need for reconciliation - all that make him the icon that he has become. >> a tribute from f.w. de klerk, a deputy president when nelson mandela became president. preparations to say farewell have been made
opponent of nelson mandela once a member of the anc and once a leader of the abuntu home land. what does this tell you about mandela. >> when he talked to us i don't think he saw in me a leader. i think he saw one of his sons or a neighbor. the relationship between the two of us culminated into a number of issues. i ended up being tasked by him on handling some sensitive issues of him at home and installations of hit his grandsn and weddings and you will see everything is in order there it was a joy to work with him and i always consider myself to have been lucky that i was one of the few in this world who was working closer to this icon. >> now you remember too we are standing outside of his home. those years that this home was filled with tear gas and people were being shot. what role did mandela play in changing that from what it was then to what it is now. >> i think we should com come m from being bold. we walked from his home and then he says stop what you are doing. it's not in the interest of the black south africans that you are killing one another. and then after that he relat
the roadshow in the 1990's when he was released from with very also spoke difficult people that were very anc at that time and he managed to get them on his side. some of them into government. >> he would go and have conversations. it was not a fight. >> did he appear in the foot bill world. football world cup? >> yes, it was very brief. what was interesting about the world cup was that we were very skeptical as whether south africa was going to be able to host it. we were waiting for them to announce. we are definitely going to be hosting the world cup, there is no way. he made the effort to arrive. am sure the changes the last minute when they saw him. >> a big draw, for clock today. can put out the favorites. the articles are a lot more balanced than the title might suggest that it is a strong ja drop. >> the england manager says emma put a bet on england. -- says to put a bet on england. >> "countdown" continues in the second hour. >> these statements have not been evaluated. thank you for watching. if you are suffering fm
was an advocate of nonviolence. becoming a leading voice in the african national congress, the anc. but in 1960, after police shot and killed 69 protesters, the anc, which had always been nonviolent, created a military wing, under mandela's command. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. >> reporter: undaunted by the brutality and inequality that was apartheid rule, mandela remained determined to end the government's forced racial segregation. >> our struggle is a truly national one. it is a struggle for the right to live. >> reporter: a struggle that led to mandela's imprisonment in 1962. and two years later, a life sentence for working to overthrow the government. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live for and to see realized. but my lords, if it needs be, it is an idea for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: four miles off the coast of capetown, south africa, on robben island, mandela spent mos
then the anc has really struggled to fulfill nelson mandela's idealistic mission. overcrowding is rife. schools on the bleak south side capetown are more typical the system is troubled with. >> information technology. >> activists argue, there is a dangerous gap between the promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate but to graduate students only need 30% of on their exams. a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> about 50% of those young people have fallen out of the system. so irt also has to do with the curriculum. it also has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had during the end today. >> so schools are still struggling with the legacy of apartheid, this generation is bearing the scars of the system much longer than nelson mandela ever imagined. peti gresta, al jazeera, cape town. >> the short list of the world football, surprises el madrid and bril brilliant in 2013, spog 16 goals for club and country. barcelona's are star has won this crown but argentina has been troubled by injury this year. midfielder, won the cham
economic and political waters. with the political icons demise the future of the a.n.c. is being thrown into question. mike hanna reports from johannesburg. >> prayers for a man who touched the lives of all. in the void left by nelson mandela's death, an awareness of challenges to come. the growing gap between rich and poor is a reminder of nelson mandela's promise of a better life is to be realised. >> i think the challenge we have for nelson mandela is to face the reality that if we don't do something for everybody, the young people will revolt, because if they remain poor and others are richer then they revolt. >> the fault lines within south african society is all-too clear of it was a labour dispute ruling in the killing of 30 at the mary carna mine -- marikana mine. many argue that the root cause was a government losing touch with those that put it in power. >> if you look at what happened over the last few years in terms of public violence, you can see that we have many, many people that don't feel represented by those in government. and the resort to violence is because we don'
and hope. >> the a.n.c. has struggled to fill full nelson mandela's vision. the system is crippled, school buildings falling apart and they have crowding. >> cape town is typical of the struggle. >> i wants to be a doctor. >> he wants to be an information technology. >> there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate, but to graduate, students only need 30% on their exams, a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> in the end of the 12 years study, about 60% of those young people have fallen out of the system, so it also has to do with the curriculum. it has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had. >> schools are still struggling with the legend of apartheid. this generation is bearing the scars of the system much longer than nelson mandela imagined. >> the world economic forum of switzerland ranked south africa 146 out of one fought eight countries in education, ranking last in mathematics and science. >> officials in singapore are cleaning up after a riot. crowds attacked police and
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)